Author Topic: Tampa airport’s ‘deteriorating’ control tower must be replaced  (Read 89 times)

Offline KB4TEZ

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would love to hear from any ATC's from Tampa on this

https://www.tampabay.com/news/business/2021/09/20/tampa-airports-deteriorating-control-tower-must-be-replaced-castor-says/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_content=FBtimes&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR0WACcoSQA1IyipFPSE1j89k6ltAtKmxFrs4KQGB6IsJG9Kfe0WfgGqpYU
(just part of a longer article from link above)

Not long ago, the elevator and air conditioning went out in Jen McCoy’s office building. That’s a headache, but in a nearly 50-year-old facility, these things happen.

What’s notable is where McCoy works: The air traffic control tower at Tampa International Airport.

“Twenty flights of stairs in this kind of heat is no fun,” said McCoy, the president of the local chapter of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. “The airport itself is very nice. They put a lot of money into it. It’s separate from our facility. The tower is very old. It is by far the worst facility I’ve been in.”

McCoy isn’t the only one who feels that way.

Tampa International is one of what the Federal Aviation Administration calls its “Core 30″ airports, generally defined as America’s busiest. The Tampa tower is the second-oldest on the list, behind a 71-year-old facility in Baltimore. Several other Florida airport towers have been replaced this century, including all three other Core 30 hubs: Orlando International Airport and Miami International Airport in 2002 and Palm Beach International Airport in 2010. An $80 million tower is nearing completion at Fort Myers’ Southwest Florida International Airport.

While most new towers are federally funded, Breitenfeldt said local airports, governments and aviation agencies, such as the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority, can contribute to some or all of a project. Airport spokesperson Veronica Cintron said that typically happens only when an airport needs to relocate a tower for its own purposes, which is not the current case with Tampa International.