Author Topic: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)  (Read 11098 times)

Offline Qantas119

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Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« on: August 17, 2009, 08:31:19 PM »
Hi all,
I'm looking for some opinions on the possibility of having completely Computer controlled aircraft for civil aviation... like the Predator but program and forget. The aircraft would have to, Push & Start, taxi, Takeoff fly the route and land without pilot intervention. let me know if this is way out there but controllers would have to just reroute the aircraft in the event of weather or a back up like JFK at rush hour. My dad seems bent on the idea that there is no real point in spending 200K at Embry Riddle to go commercial if this might happen in the future. and that there will only have to be one pilot on-board to help in the system crashes. So lets have some opinions :-)

Thanks,
Tyler

along these lines...?



Offline atcman23

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2009, 08:42:05 PM »
I don't know about you, but I don't want to step on an aircraft that has no pilots.  I'd want someone there to fly the aircraft.  Besides, I don't think the overall public opinion on pilot-less commercial aircraft is too good and if the idea ever got popular, I think the technology for something like that is an easy 20 years away... or better.

Sorry to put you dad's hopes down. :(
Mark Spencer

Offline Qantas119

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2009, 08:48:31 PM »
I'm all with the FAA's stand and yours on the subject, i keep telling him that it just wont happen beacuse of the possibility of hacking, the demand on Satlilites and the doubt of the public. he seems pretty certain on the fact that it will happen.
Just started it to see what peoples opionons are on the subject.
Thanks,
Tyler

Offline w0x0f

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2009, 09:03:31 PM »
I'm with Mark and Tyler.  I guess smart bombs aren't so smart after all.   :-D

w0x0f

Offline Biff

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2009, 12:11:05 PM »
I believe you're safe in your future aviation career.  :)

At least as far as pilots being replaced by software goes.
 

Offline MathFox

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2009, 04:51:36 PM »
It is one thing to fly remote-control model planes;
It took decades to get to the first military applications;
Flying cargo may be the next step, starting 15-20 years from now, needs to sort out issues with ATC and VFR traffic.
If engineers work hard, you may see the first remote control passenger planes when you near retirement in 30-40 years.

Offline RV1

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2009, 01:46:11 AM »
When there is a pilot onboard, he has a little more 'vested interest' in the safety of the plane! versus if he was on the ground somewhere. He may not care quite so much if his life isn't on the line as well as the passengers should something happen to the airplane.
I think that your career choice is safe.
Kick butt, take no names, they dont matter anyways

Offline wampler24

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2009, 01:30:35 PM »
New here so don't want to step on toes but I think that regretably this will be our future. Maybe not in the near future but still there none the less.

  Ask an Aviator from 75 years ago and they would have laughed when you mentioned fly by wire. (OK, maybe more tha 75) I would not like that idea but knowing companies and deep pockets, it would not surprise me at all to see this idea come to light.

 Working in the computer field, I see more and more automated processes become streamline and accepted. From machines welding the most important structures in your cars to computers making decisions about whats for lunch. Technology will affect it all. A 747 can already fly itself with minimal input from it's Pilot. A UPS pilot put it to me best... " My job is to point it in the right direction down the runway and then leave it alone." Now, as he put it again to me, he has to be trained and ready for anything which is where human intervintion is needed but like the flight up north with the stick shaker problem, sometimes Humans thank we know better....

 Jeezz... This is starting to sound like the Terminator movie. :)

 

Offline joeyb747

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2009, 08:41:22 PM »
You know what they say, in the future, airplanes will have one pilot and a dog.

The pilot would be on board to monitor the aircraft systems.

The dog will be there to bite the pilot if he touches anything!! 

:wink: :lol: :wink: :roll:

Seriously, I think pilots will be needed for a long time. Airplanes will become more modern, but will need pilots.
Aircraft Mechanic

Offline FlyAuburn13

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2009, 07:51:05 PM »
I just don't think people would be comfortable getting onto a plane without a pilot on board.  There's just too much of a possibility of hacking or computer failures etc.  We already have the technology, that's not the issue.  It's just not realistic to think that commercial flights would experiment with it.
War Damn Eagle

Offline Pilot3033

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Re: Computers in control (Future of Aviation)
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2009, 03:33:10 AM »
Give this article by Patrick Smith a read: http://www.salon.com/tech/col/smith/2009/11/19/askthepilot342/index.html
It might offer some more concrete insight into the hard issues surrounding automated aircraft.