Author Topic: Aircraft identification by letter T_  (Read 17489 times)

Offline Qantas119

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Aircraft identification by letter T_
« on: June 07, 2009, 09:49:33 AM »
So my question to allof you pilots & or controlers is the reason the airline industry use the letter T(TANGO) to identify aircraft. my only example is the Boeing 777 is identified with the combination T7. so i was wondering the reason?

thanks,
Tyler



Offline jmcmanna

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Re: Aircraft identification by letter T_
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2009, 01:08:15 PM »
Referencing the attached picture, "T7" is slang for "Boeing 777" or "Triple-7", as in "this is the latest Boeing 777..."

Otherwise, there's "Tango November" callsigns occasionally, which are designators for Air Taxi aircraft.

Also, T7 is the IATA code for "Twin Jet" airlines.

I have no idea what is being asked in the first post . . . do any of the above answer the question?

Offline atcman23

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Re: Aircraft identification by letter T_
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2009, 02:03:56 PM »
I believe the person who started the thread is referring to the "T7" remark in the picture, in which, the first reply is correct.  As for aircraft callsigns, if you see a "TN12345", the "T" in front of the "N" references an air taxi flight.

Not sure why they chose T7 to stand for "Twin Jet" aircraft.  There are some things that just can't be explained with the IATA and ICAO.
Mark Spencer

Offline sykocus

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Re: Aircraft identification by letter T_
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2009, 02:34:22 PM »
nevermind
« Last Edit: June 07, 2009, 02:38:34 PM by sykocus »
Yesterday I couldn't spell air traffic controller. Today I R one.

Offline cessna157

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Re: Aircraft identification by letter T_
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2009, 03:00:10 PM »
Not sure why they chose T7 to stand for "Twin Jet" aircraft.  There are some things that just can't be explained with the IATA and ICAO.

Some are clever, some are not, and some are just leftovers.  Comair (OH) is based in Cincinnati, OHio metro area, so that makes sense as a clever one.  Another was ACA/Independence (BR), which recalled to ACA's callsign Blue Ridge, since they were based in the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

Skywest is OO and ASA is EV, I don't understand those.  And Freedom and Frontier are F8 and F9, which seem to be just leftovers.

The legacy carriers have pretty normal IATA codes though:  Delta (DL), American (AA), United (UA), USAirways (US...I assume US, and not HP)
CRJ7/CRJ9 F/O, Travel Agent

Offline atcman23

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Re: Aircraft identification by letter T_
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2009, 06:14:20 PM »
Not sure why they chose T7 to stand for "Twin Jet" aircraft.  There are some things that just can't be explained with the IATA and ICAO.

Some are clever, some are not, and some are just leftovers.  Comair (OH) is based in Cincinnati, OHio metro area, so that makes sense as a clever one.  Another was ACA/Independence (BR), which recalled to ACA's callsign Blue Ridge, since they were based in the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

Skywest is OO and ASA is EV, I don't understand those.  And Freedom and Frontier are F8 and F9, which seem to be just leftovers.

The legacy carriers have pretty normal IATA codes though:  Delta (DL), American (AA), United (UA), USAirways (US...I assume US, and not HP)

I think you got them all.. USAir is US.  Not if you get into their old "legacy" carriers they bought out... it's a different ball game.
Mark Spencer

Offline jhwenger

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Re: Aircraft identification by letter T_
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2009, 02:49:14 PM »
Who knows where some of them come from. I used to work for a commuter named Air Metro whose code was JB for the presidents initials J.B. Hayner.