Author Topic: Winter's woes in northern Ontario  (Read 5194 times)

Offline Jonathan_tcu

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« on: November 07, 2005, 06:49:34 AM »
Our local FSS has closed rwy 10/28 due to snow.  Our Jazz 7830 who is scheduled to depart at 7:30, departed shortly after 9.  Our viz was steady at between 1/8 and 1/4 sm with moderate snow.  Air traffic was rather quiet all day because of that.  Plus, when Jazz 7829 was on approach at 6:30, he almost returned to Toronto, b/c the runway friction index was n/a until he got the decimal 32 mark which is ok to land.  

Meanwhile, southern Ontario had its share.  I listened to CZYZ and learned of multiple comm failures due to power failures.  It's gotta be stressfull when the low and high altitude sectors can't co-ordinate properly due to the power outtage.  Welcome to winter!


FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.

Offline bcrosby

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2005, 01:43:18 PM »
Runway friction index. I was reading about the CRFI in my CFS the other day.

I never thought pilots actually used it, but I guess so.

Is it the ground controllers job to advertise the CRFI. Is it announced in the ATIS?

Offline Jonathan_tcu

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2005, 05:12:27 PM »
Yes it is.  The RSC (Runway Surface Condition) and Runway Friction Index is always published on the ATIS, both here and when I was in North Bay too.  The higher the number, the greater the slipperiness.  So decimal 70 would be very slippery upon rwy contact, meanwhile 30 or lesser is more stable.  "Runway Friction Index at temperature minus 2 was decimal three zero (30), conditions taken at 1206 zulu today."
FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.

Offline binky

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2005, 02:17:21 PM »
You've got the index backwards. The lower the number (RFI) the less braking effect (more slippery).

Offline Jonathan_tcu

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2005, 06:42:11 PM »
The lower the number, the greater the slip and the higher the number, that so to speak translates to greater breaking or better stopping on the runway.
FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.

Offline bcrosby

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2005, 10:21:50 AM »
0.4 is more slippery than 0.8

Offline Tomato

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2005, 02:37:35 PM »
I'm starting to see this somewhat like the friction co-efficient... higher number => more friction => better braking/stopping.  (I realize this is oversimplified, but...)
Serving you with CYVR... =)

Offline Jonathan_tcu

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2005, 08:30:39 PM »
So the lower the number, zero being don't land  :lol:  while 99 is don't flip over...right?
FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.

Offline Runhog

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2005, 11:12:14 PM »
Quote from: Jonathan_tcu
So the lower the number, zero being don't land  :lol:  while 99 is don't flip over...right?


Yes, doubt you'll ever see .99. At our aerodrome for instance (training facility),  a reading of .42 or lower and we stop launching aircraft. Solo students will be diverted, flight instructors will attempt to land as long as it isn't too far off from .42.

Offline bcrosby

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Winter's woes in northern Ontario
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2005, 10:37:06 AM »