airtraffic

Author Topic: Center & approach frequencies use  (Read 3907 times)

Offline Chananya Freedman

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Center & approach frequencies use
« on: November 24, 2010, 01:49:51 PM »
How does it work? Are the frequencies linked if the controller is hundreds of miles away? For example So cal approach for BUR and LA Center.



Offline sykocus

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Re: Center & approach frequencies use
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2010, 03:41:57 PM »
How does it work? Are the frequencies linked if the controller is hundreds of miles away? For example So cal approach for BUR and LA Center.

There are multiple ways and usually several are in use at the same time for redundancy. I'm aware of 3 ways: microwave link that can be use when there's line of sight and satellite link when there's not and there could be good old fashioned copper wire.

edit:
Also, I suppose it's possible to digitize the signal and send it via broadband intra/internet. I know there's a dedicated T1 line running to our radar and main radio radio site. I don't know if it only carries the radar (which is digitized at some point) or if it carries the radio Tx/Rx too.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 07:34:53 AM by sykocus »

Offline StuSEL

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Re: Center & approach frequencies use
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2010, 01:41:10 AM »
Another example is Flight Service Stations. I talked to a guy who worked on some of these lines for Bellsouth and later AT&T, and he said most of the nation's radio comms are linked via copper or fiber optic cable between the radio sites. AT&T was actually responsible for a radio outage at Socal a couple of years ago for this very reason.

Offline cessna157

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Re: Center & approach frequencies use
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2010, 07:21:13 AM »
Most of it is via terrestial data lines when microwave links are not available