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91
Aviation Audio Clips / Runway lights go dark at Southwest Florida Regional Airport
« Last post by KB4TEZ on June 14, 2022, 06:54:03 AM »
https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/why-did-the-runway-lights-go-dark-at-southwest-florida-regional-airport-on-june-3/ar-AAYrmjb?li=BBnb7Kz

There is only one runway at Southwest Florida International Airport in Fort Myers. When on the rare occurrence there is a power outage and the runway lights go off like they did on the evening of June 3, it could mean flights have to be diverted until the lights come back on.

Two flights ended up being diverted to Tampa on June 3, according to Victoria Moreland, Chief Communications & Marketing Officer for the Lee County Port Authority — American Airlines Flight No. 801 and Alaska Airlines Flight No. 1491.Moreland said in an email that tree debris from the tropical system that affected Southwest Florida earlier this month was the cause of the outage.
"(The debris) was impacting an FPL (Florida Power & Light) line that feeds the north side of the airport to include the north side tenants, roadway lighting on Chamberlain and the runway lights," Moreland said.

Moreland said it is not common for the runway lights to go out, but it is  not unprecedented. She said it has been documented as happening once in the mid-1990s and another time in December 2014.

What are the protocols that kick in when something like this happens?

"Airfield Maintenance responds for troubleshooting, diagnoses the issue and implements a solution to restore power as quickly as possible," Moreland said. "(The airport) also works with FPL to resolve the issue."

Here is a timeline Moreland provided:

9:35 p.m. — All runway lights were lost

10:26 p.m. — Airfield maintenance restored runway edge lights on temporary power.

10:34 p.m. —  Airfield maintenance restored runway centerline lights on temporary power.

11:00 p.m. — First aircraft landed.

Moreland said a generator was used to provide temporary power until the main line could be repaired.

Full FPL power was restored sometime just prior to or around midnight to all north side panels, Moreland said.

RSW averages about 375 daily flights during season and 200 daily during the off-season with 16 airlines flying to 61 destinations.

New carrier starts: Breeze Airways makes it debut at Southwest Florida International Airport with Airbus jets

More: Best public access golf courses list includes this gem in Lee County

Heather Merrick, who was flying from Seattle to Fort Myers on Alaska Airlines Flight No. 1491 on June 3, contacted The News-Press and Naples Daily News via an email about her experience with the power outage.

"As we were descending into RSW, it was rainy and dark and the flight was very bumpy," Merrick said. "Suddenly, even though we were close to our destination we began to gain altitude again. There was no communication from the pilots for quite some time (15-20 minutes). They then informed us that we had not landed at RSW because the runway lights went out completely."

Merrick lives in Seattle now, but she said she grew up in Naples.

"I had never heard of something like this happening at RSW before," she said.

Merrick added that after some time on the ground in Tampa and after the pilots confirmed with the RSW staff that the lights were back on, her plane flew back to RSW.
92
Audio of the time line posted in the Audio Clip Section

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/why-did-the-runway-lights-go-dark-at-southwest-florida-regional-airport-on-june-3/ar-AAYrmjb?li=BBnb7Kz

There is only one runway at Southwest Florida International Airport in Fort Myers. When on the rare occurrence there is a power outage and the runway lights go off like they did on the evening of June 3, it could mean flights have to be diverted until the lights come back on.

Two flights ended up being diverted to Tampa on June 3, according to Victoria Moreland, Chief Communications & Marketing Officer for the Lee County Port Authority — American Airlines Flight No. 801 and Alaska Airlines Flight No. 1491.Moreland said in an email that tree debris from the tropical system that affected Southwest Florida earlier this month was the cause of the outage.
"(The debris) was impacting an FPL (Florida Power & Light) line that feeds the north side of the airport to include the north side tenants, roadway lighting on Chamberlain and the runway lights," Moreland said.

Moreland said it is not common for the runway lights to go out, but it is  not unprecedented. She said it has been documented as happening once in the mid-1990s and another time in December 2014.

What are the protocols that kick in when something like this happens?

"Airfield Maintenance responds for troubleshooting, diagnoses the issue and implements a solution to restore power as quickly as possible," Moreland said. "(The airport) also works with FPL to resolve the issue."

Here is a timeline Moreland provided:

9:35 p.m. — All runway lights were lost

10:26 p.m. — Airfield maintenance restored runway edge lights on temporary power.

10:34 p.m. —  Airfield maintenance restored runway centerline lights on temporary power.

11:00 p.m. — First aircraft landed.

Moreland said a generator was used to provide temporary power until the main line could be repaired.

Full FPL power was restored sometime just prior to or around midnight to all north side panels, Moreland said.

RSW averages about 375 daily flights during season and 200 daily during the off-season with 16 airlines flying to 61 destinations.

New carrier starts: Breeze Airways makes it debut at Southwest Florida International Airport with Airbus jets

More: Best public access golf courses list includes this gem in Lee County

Heather Merrick, who was flying from Seattle to Fort Myers on Alaska Airlines Flight No. 1491 on June 3, contacted The News-Press and Naples Daily News via an email about her experience with the power outage.

"As we were descending into RSW, it was rainy and dark and the flight was very bumpy," Merrick said. "Suddenly, even though we were close to our destination we began to gain altitude again. There was no communication from the pilots for quite some time (15-20 minutes). They then informed us that we had not landed at RSW because the runway lights went out completely."

Merrick lives in Seattle now, but she said she grew up in Naples.

"I had never heard of something like this happening at RSW before," she said.

Merrick added that after some time on the ground in Tampa and after the pilots confirmed with the RSW staff that the lights were back on, her plane flew back to RSW.
93
ARTCC/FIR/TRACON Maps / Re: Australia ATC Frequency chart
« Last post by AnkerAnn on June 14, 2022, 03:56:06 AM »
I constantly use Liveatc to track flights along the East Coast, Midwest, and West Coast and there are numerous holes in coverage. I frequently track from Florida to NY/NJ/CT and there is holes in coverage along the way

94
Saw the movie last weekend, and found this article interesting.
pretty neat too.
(just an exerpt below of the full article)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/news/top-gun-maverick-f-18-dogfighting-action-scenes-filmed-by-an-embraer-business-jet/ar-AAYo2fy?li=BBnb7Kz

"Top Gun: Maverick" is loaded with IMAX-worthy high-speed footage of F/A-18 Super Hornets dogfighting, dodging missiles, chasing through canyons and zooming over snow-capped mountaintops.

Turns out much of the movie's action-packed aerial cinematography was filmed by — of all aircraft — a Melbourne-manufactured Embraer executive jet.A specially outfitted Phenom 300E "camera ship" offered an airframe platform and technological advances that helped "set the standard for aerial cinematography," Kevin "K2" LaRosa II, aerial coordinator and lead camera pilot, told FLORIDA TODAY.

“The general theme of the movie is a love letter to aviation. The movie is packed with aerials from start to finish — literally, opening sequence to end sequence of the movie," LaRosa said.“Joseph Kosinski, one of my favorite directors in the world, does a beautiful job of storytelling and has this natural progression throughout the movie of the aerials. That’s kind of designed to keep people on the edge of their seats," he said.

"So as we watch this movie, I feel like the aerials just naturally progress in energy (and) become more dynamic. Right up to the final sequence, where the Phenom 300 was used extensively — which is some of the craziest flying in the movie," he said.A second-generation stunt pilot, LaRosa II has flown, coordinated and directed aerial film sequences on more than 100 productions, including movies like "Iron Man," "The Avengers" and "Godzilla"; television shows such as "NCIS: Los Angeles"; and commercials for SpaceX, Amazon, Apple, Delta, Honda and Toyota.

LaRosa said "Top Gun: Maverick" was shot primarily along the West Coast, with aerial territory stretching from San Diego northward to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island near Oak Harbor, Washington. That military facility served as a base while filming shots above rugged peaks in the Cascade Mountains, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported.

The unique Phenom 300E is owned by Jonathan Spano, a Long Beach aviation entrepreneur and stunt pilot.

Spano modified his aircraft to carry two gyro-stabilized camera systems to film "Top Gun: Maverick.” That way, they could use two combinations of lenses to shoot the same flight sequences.“It took us almost two years to go through the engineering, the design and the (Federal Aviation Administration) certification for the aircraft,” Spano said.

“We’re talking about a 300-pound mass that is about 2-foot round hanging off the front of the aircraft. And it hangs off the nose — and we’re traveling at speeds of 300 knots. So the engineering involved to do this safely, it was pretty extensive," he said.

“And then, another 300-pound mass hanging off the tail of the aircraft gave us access to more shots. So we could look aft, instead of just forward and to the sides," he said.

Spano flew alongside LaRosa as a camera pilot. Inside the cabin, camera operators David Nowell and Michael FitzMaurice controlled the cameras using high-tech workstations.

Since LaRosa started flying camera jets 11 years ago, he said he was forced to fly in a certain manner to make the shots look smoother. Not so with the Phenom. LaRosa said he and Spano could fly the jet “kind of like we stole it,” and the on-board operators could aim the cameras in the right spots.

LaRosa said he and Spano shared laughs during “Top Gun: Maverick” filming that they were running the Embraer through aggressive aerobatic rigors “where a Phenom 300 has never been before and will probably never, ever go again.”

But by contrast, he said crew members flying aboard the executive jet sat in plush leather seats near a food-beverage galley adorned with wood-grain trim — a far cry from the typical Hollywood camera platform.

During one film sequence, LaRosa recalled pushing the Phenom’s negative-G stresses to the limit by zooming into a dive behind an F-18.
“We’re literally feet away from this thing. We’re tucked right in behind it, which is a pretty cool view,” LaRosa recalled.

“But what we learned was, our super-cool mini-bar setup up there in the air doesn’t like weightlessness. All of a sudden, Jon and I had this ice and cold water floating around us. We were just like, ‘What’s going on here?’ " he said.

"And our ice chest — which I don’t think Embraer built for F-18 dogfighting and maneuvering — was slowly emptying itself as everything was weightless in the aircraft," he said.

"So that was one of our funny lessons learned on how to prep our plush, luxurious Phenom 300 camera ship for high-octane filming," he said.
95
I'm delighted I stumbled into your remarks because I'm hunting for posts that are comparable to yours.
96
https://www.wshu.org/long-island-news/2022-06-08/east-hampton-will-begin-the-process-of-shuttering-its-airport

The Town of East Hampton on Long Island will begin the process of permanently closing its airport. This comes after the town failed to convert the facility from public to private.

Officials said a “mountain of litigation” prevented the town from implementing the proper regulations to make East Hampton Airport a private-use-only facility.

The goal was to appease residents who have been complaining about noise and traffic for decades. The new “prior permission required” framework was meant to be a compromise — it would allow the airport to continue to operate, but with a limited number of planes.

Lawsuits from pilots claimed the criteria to use the airport was confusing, far too expensive and undermined federal policy. A temporary restraining order issued by a New York State Supreme Court justice brought the plan to a halt.

Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc has said before that if the airport was not meeting the original goal of addressing complaints from residents, it would be closed.

Some pilots said shuttering the airport in Wainscott would likely create more traffic at other airports on eastern Long Island.
97
Aviation Audio Clips / Fedex MD10 near Tulsa on Jun 7th 2022 fire on cargo deck
« Last post by KB4TEZ on June 08, 2022, 02:59:19 PM »
(Story from AVH)
I've attached the audio

A Fedex Federal Express McDonnell Douglas MD-10, registration N306FE performing flight FX-463 from Sacramento,CA to Memphis,TN (USA) with 3 crew, was enroute at FL310 about 40nm northwest of Tulsa,OK (USA) when the crew decided to divert to Tulsa due to a fire indication in the cargo bay. On approach the crew reported they now got an additional cargo fire alert in the aft cargo area. The crew requested runway 18L and landed safely about 18 minutes after leaving FL310. Tower reported seeing no smoke from the aircraft. Emergency services reported a heat signature prompting the crew to evacuate the aircraft. Both runways at Tulsa were closed for about 30 minutes while emergency services put the fire out.

Tower advised other aircraft on approach that the airport was closed to an evacuation on the runway, the Fedex aircraft was actually on fire.

Tulsa Fire Department reported the crew evacuated safely, both runways were closed for about 30 minutes. The aircraft was towed to the cargo apron soon after the fire was put out. A number of aircraft decided to divert as result.

The occurrence aircraft is still on the ground about 19 hours after landing.

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/FDX463/history/20220607/1342Z/KSMF/KMEM
98
Listener Forum / Re: KJFK 123.9 monitoring 119.1 instead
« Last post by dave on June 07, 2022, 03:18:42 PM »
Sorry for the delay but this issue has been resolved.
99
Listener Forum / Re: KBIL Approach and Ground are silent
« Last post by mtpiper on June 07, 2022, 12:17:56 PM »
Dave and crew are looking into it.
100
Feed Outage/Status Reports / KBIL ground and approach feeds down
« Last post by mtpiper on June 07, 2022, 12:08:06 PM »
KBIL approach and ground feeds have been down for a while for unknown reason.
Dave is looking into it. Reception at the site is ok, the channels are up, but there is no audio on those 2 feeds.
Tower and ZLC Sector 15 feeds are still good.
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