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Author Topic: Conquest Air Cargo Convair Ditches Off Florida Coast  (Read 491 times)

Offline joeyb747

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Conquest Air Cargo Convair Ditches Off Florida Coast
« on: February 08, 2019, 06:06:35 PM »
Conquest Air Cargo C-131B N145GT (1954, CN 256) was returning to Opa Locka (KOPF) when it ditched several miles off the Florida coast. According to Avherald, both engines failed. One crew member was rescued, the search continues for the other crew member. 

Avherald:

http://avherald.com/h?article=4c3efa5b&opt=0

Flight Radar 24:
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 10:42:20 AM by joeyb747 »



Offline joeyb747

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Re: Conquest Air Cargo Convair Ditches Off Florida Coast
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2019, 06:30:30 AM »
"On Feb 22nd 2019 the NTSB released their preliminary report stating the crew had departed Opa Locka for Nassau with 900 gallons of fuel on board but experienced trouble with the left hand propeller control enroute to Nassau when the propeller became stuck at 2400rpm. The crew was unable to reset the propeller control. A message sent to maintenance did not transmit. The captain decided that they wouldn't start up for the return flight, if the propeller control had not reset they'd shut down again and wait for maintenance. Both engines and propellers came up normally however and they departed for Opa Locka.

Climbing through 4000 feet the left hand propeller became again stuck at 2400 rpm. The captain managed to bump the propeller up to 2700 rpm, equalized power on both engines, levelled off at 4500 feet, cancelled the IFR flight plan and continued visually to Opa Locka. The flight was uneventful until they began the descent to 1500 feet. At that point the right hand engine "backfired" and surged. The crew shut the engine down. A short time later the left hand engine also backfired and surged. The captain continued flying the aircraft while the first officer worked the related checklists, however, when they were getting too low and it became clear they had to ditch the captain instructed to declare Mayday and brace for impact.

The NTSB reported the captain (ATPL) had 23,000 hours total, 725 hours thereof on the accident aircraft. The first officer (CPL) had 650 flight hours, thereof 305 hours on the accident aircraft.

The NTSB reported the captain was fatally injured, the first officer received serious injuries but was able to provide testimony to the NTSB."


From:

http://avherald.com/h?article=4c3efa5b&opt=0