Author Topic: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503  (Read 11063 times)

Offline 121mhz

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N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« on: May 03, 2016, 08:07:44 PM »
Taken from KJFK NY DEP for 1900Z and 1930Z today.



Offline semperflyer797

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Re: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2016, 03:35:21 AM »
OK after listening to the tape, the first thing that crossed my mind was the way the New York controller seemed to take exception to the fact that the pilot had declared an emergency, but was continuing on to his destination.  I'm not trying to bash the controller in any way, but the pilot clearly stated he was "partial panel", and that he had lost his vacuum system but was "VFR on top" at that time.  Believing that the weather would be better at his destination than where he left or was currently, and making the decision to continue on seems perfectly legitimate to me at that point.  How many times is there an aircraft going to JFK with an emergency or that has one develop while on approach and still lands there.  Declaring the emergency should've let the controllers know, hey I'm having issues and won't or can't do certain things right now, so we need to work together to try to get to the best outcome.  The controller did do all that I can think he could've done after he gave them the weather at Hartford.  I don't know what equipment the pilot did or didn't have working, but I've done training in simulators and with safety instructors in VFR conditions simulating vacuum system failures.  Trying to fly by GPS and turn coordinator alone in the simulation is one thing, but doing it real world is a completely different animal.  Doing it in actual IMC conditions, I can only imagine how difficult it would be.  Without trying to be a backseat pilot or second guess what this pilot did based on his circumstances and weather, the only thing I can say I might have tried to do, would be to try to stay VFR as long as possible, and hope better weather would develope somewhere I could get to.  My deepest condolences to the family's of those who died. 

Offline smark220

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Re: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2016, 08:49:40 AM »
OK after listening to the tape, the first thing that crossed my mind was the way the New York controller seemed to take exception to the fact that the pilot had declared an emergency, but was continuing on to his destination.

I didn't get that impression at all. I think he was trying to understand and confirm the pilot's intentions because I think it somewhat unusual to the controller that he would declare and proceed with the flight as normal.

I wouldn't notify the controller "partial panel," but specifically what instruments I lost.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2016, 10:03:52 AM by smark220 »

Offline deputy66

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Re: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2016, 12:18:57 PM »
ATC can only do so much.  The controller can suggest alternatives but the responsibility always rests with the PIC.  With 2.5 hours fuel aboard, perhaps he could have asked if there were any VFR conditions to the west or elsewhere. In a BE 35, that's a lot of ground you can cover in 2 hours. He wasn't even close to the service ceiling of the aircraft and he could have gone higher to avoid IMC. It's a terrible tragedy, made even worse to heard the last words of a calm pilot. Back-up vacuum pumps should be required equipment on all single engine A/C.

Offline semperflyer797

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Re: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2016, 07:04:33 PM »
. Back-up vacuum pumps should be required equipment on all single engine A/C.

I think I'd prefer to see backup electrical instruments with the proliferation of GPS coupleable instruments.  They usually offer a battery backup system separate from the aircraft's electrical system to them as well, so it's like a double backup.  Plus this gives you two separate systems completely capable of doing the job should one malfunction.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2016, 07:06:09 PM by semperflyer797 »

Offline patmike

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Re: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2016, 06:17:50 PM »
A couple of guys I work with knew the pilot and I was kind of wondering. Isn't this whole vacuum pump system kind of antiquated? Instead of ADS-B being the big priority why couldn't it be to retrofit all aircraft that use a vacuum pump system to something electronic with a battery backup. I'm thinking and Ipad or even Iphone with the proper app could have save these lives. Foreflight with the synthetic vision option would have been a game changer in this one.

Offline MeridianDriver

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Re: N440H BE35 crashed on Long Island 20160503
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2016, 10:30:50 PM »
 :-(  Very sad.  I do not think that ATC did anything wrong.  They in fact tried to help.  I believe the pilot was perhaps too casual about the situation.  He had an absolute emergency and should have stayed VFR if at all possible.  With 2 hours of fuel remaining, he probably could have landed VFR.  Hartford wasn't too bad at 1,600', but he'd have to descend through the clouds to get there and that could have been a problem. 

Vacuum systems suck!!!  Now, with the $900 Stratus there is NO excuse for anyone not to have a digital system.  I have dual GTN750's and dual G500's, plus an L3 digital backup artificial horizon and just started trying the Stratus 2 just for fun and I'm blown away with how good it is compared to my very expensive panel.  I believe it would have saved this poor guy's life.

Basic equipment that every pilot should have: Digital ADHRS of some sort - could be ForeFlight on an iPad with Stratus and a floating ePERB.  Total cost: 2 to 3 hamburger runs or around $1,200 (not including the iPad as everyone has that already). 

The FAA was unbelievable slow in approving backup artificial horizons to replace the 100 year old turn and bank indicator (Sperry won the Colliers Trophy for inventing it in 1916).  Now, perhaps they should move fast to mandate that all pilots have some sort of digital back up.  Time has come.

Don