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Author Topic: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID  (Read 12356 times)

Offline IndyTower

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UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« on: February 27, 2009, 12:26:19 AM »
I haven't posted on here much for a couple of years, let alone audio clips.  Though I happened to be listening to my Indy Center feed tonight when I heard this.  I can't say I've ever heard a medical emergency cancelled, however.  Thought it was worth posting.

Dead air and transmissions from other aircraft has been removed.



Offline Junior P

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2009, 07:19:39 AM »
that was different! Wouldnt it be best to get that person off the airplane sooner than later due the the condition. In my opinion he shouldnt have cancelled the emergency! but he where i want to be so i guess he knows best!

Offline Galaxy001

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2009, 10:35:36 AM »
Interesting.  It's also interesting how the nurse gave the advice to the captain to continue to Denver.  You'd think that only a doctor would be allowed to do that.  I'm surprised that the captain continued on to Denver rather than divert, even if the emergency seemed over. 

Offline mk

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2009, 11:05:23 AM »
looks like they ended up in Kansas City instead.

Offline delta092b

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2009, 08:51:11 PM »
I thought airlines had their own service that provides information/recommendations to the captain based on situation.  I agree with Galaxy that a doctor should really be making the call whether to proceed or not.

Interesting post though. Must be quite scary for a a sick passenger when you've been unconsious for 35 minutes and come around on a plane.

Offline sykocus

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2009, 10:21:01 PM »
Well anyone can give advice. The ultimate decision falls on the captain. It wouldn't matter if the surgeon general told him to land. The captain makes makes the decisions and has answer for them later. If a medical doctor had identified himself on the flight I'm sure he would have been the one giving the advice, but it seems a nurse was the most qualified person available at the time.

Offline dska22

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2009, 05:22:04 PM »
Although a doctor's advice might be best, even a nurse wouldn't be necessary in this case.  I believe I hear the pilot saying that the passenger is on medication, indicating it's a preexisting condition.  As a result, the patient may have requested to continue to Denver when they woke up.  It's very reasonable for someone who has a diagnosed condition, but suffers occasional attacks, to know that they will be okay due to past experience with this medical condition.

Offline N628PW

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2009, 01:42:28 PM »
It's all about liability.

Offline Claytonwindham

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2009, 11:07:17 PM »
This sounds like a diabetic problem. If so, the patient's blood sugar got too low after a dose of insulin and she fainted. If this is the case, she simply didn't eat with her medication. All you have to is get the patient to eat something sugary to bring the blood sugar back up. Complications occur if you can't get the patient to wake up then you have to have IV sugars added. If this was the case and the proper actions were taken, then it was perfectly logical to continue onward.

Offline athaker

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2009, 01:08:59 AM »
Another possibility is some seizure disorder (like epilepsy).

When I worked 911 in Los Angeles County, as long as it wasn't the patient's first seizure and they have a known disorder, they could refuse transport to the ER.  The seizure can last a couple of minutes, using up a lot of energy and decreasing breathing.  The last phase of the seizure is the postictal state in which the patient can be unconscious, severely disoriented, lethargic, combative, etc.  During the entire thing all you have to do is make sure they don't hurt themselves (in LA, we never worried about a little thing as a tongue.  We're talking head injury) and give them some oxygen to maybe make up for decreased ventilations. 

During that postictal state, you just wait it out, and it can take several minutes.  Eventually, blood sugar, alertness, orientation, etc. all come back to perfectly normal.  As long as there's no physical injury, no need for ER.

Speculation, of course, but if the seize time plus post-seizure disorientation got exaggerated to 35 min unconscious (as was always the case from bystanders on those 911 calls), this was a simple seizure, and it's, as clayton put it, perfectly logical to continue onward.  The ER would have glanced at her then sent her home.

kea001

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Re: UAL933 medical emergency on ZID
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2009, 06:39:07 PM »
Another possibility is some seizure disorder (like epilepsy).
 perfectly logical to continue onward.  The ER would have glanced at her then sent her home.

I agree with everything you said except the glaring fact that they did finally divert to Kansas City can't be overlooked.
I would be curious to find out what actually transpired.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2009, 06:41:38 PM by kea001 »