Author Topic: Allegiant Air 737 Engine Failure  (Read 8543 times)

Offline RonR

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 913
Allegiant Air 737 Engine Failure
« on: November 13, 2013, 11:40:42 AM »
On Sunday November 10 an Allegiant Air MD-80 had an engine failure (compressor stall) on departure out of KBGR.  The flight returned to KBGR without incident.  The audio is attached condensed to about five minutes.


Feed Provider:
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 1
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 2
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 3
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 4
ZBW (CLIPR32/HTO31)
ZBW (DXR19/SOUTHIE49)
KLGA Gnd
KLGA Dep
KLGA Twr
NY App (Liberty/North)
KLGA App (HAARP)
KLGA Del/ARINC/TCA

Offline RonR

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 913
Feed Provider:
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 1
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 2
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 3
ZBW/ZNY/ZDC (JFK Area) 4
ZBW (CLIPR32/HTO31)
ZBW (DXR19/SOUTHIE49)
KLGA Gnd
KLGA Dep
KLGA Twr
NY App (Liberty/North)
KLGA App (HAARP)
KLGA Del/ARINC/TCA

Offline phil-s

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
Re: Allegiant Air 737 Engine Failure
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2013, 07:45:34 PM »
Took me a few to figure that 737 meant MD-80. I've never run into a flight number identical to a very common aircraft type number. Is there any effort to avoid this? Just curious.

757-rules

  • Guest
Re: Allegiant Air 737 Engine Failure
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2013, 09:07:38 AM »
Took me a few to figure that 737 meant MD-80. I've never run into a flight number identical to a very common aircraft type number. Is there any effort to avoid this? Just curious.

I understand the confusion, and so did others:
Quote
Flight numbers of less than three digits are often assigned to long-haul or otherwise premium flights. Flight number 1 is often used for an airline's "flagship" service. For example, British Airways flight 1 was the early morning supersonic Concorde service from London to New York City; Air New Zealand flight 1 is the daily service from London to Auckland via Los Angeles; and El Al flight 1 is the daily overnight service from Tel Aviv to New York City. Four-digit numbers in the range 1000 to 4999 typically represent regional affiliate flights, while numbers larger than 5000 are generally codeshare numbers for flights operated by a different airlines or even railways.

Likewise, flight numbers larger than 9000 are usually referred to ferry flights, that carry no passengers and are only to move an aircraft from point A to point B, where it is supposed to start a new commercial flight. Flight numbers starting with 8 are often used for charter flights, but it always depends on the commercial carrier choice.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_number
« Last Edit: November 14, 2013, 09:10:28 AM by 757-rules »