Author Topic: 24 April: Hard landing at Spirit of St Louis Airport (KSUS), Missouri  (Read 1300 times)

Offline GeoffSM1

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Story and news video http://www.kmov.com/story/35230825/emergency-crews-respond-to-plane-crash-at-spirit-of-st-louis-airport

'As there was no distress call made, authorities believe the plane suffered a hard landing.'

Whilst it seems the pilot did not declare an emergency, after making two unsuccessful attempts to land on runway 8L he told the controller he was worried about fuel and asked  if there was a a grass area where he could land in a more favorable direction. Permission was refused. Subsequently the aircraft made the very heavy landing on the runway and sustained significant damage. The pilot was lucky not to be injured. If he had declared an emergency would he have been able to insist on landing on the grass?  Should the controller have given him the opportunity? In short, could the situation have been dealt with differently?
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 05:13:43 AM by GeoffSM1 »



Offline mike_ny

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Re: 24 April: Hard landing at Spirit of St Louis Airport (KSUS), Missouri
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2017, 05:51:31 PM »
Geoff,
You are correct. For a fuel emergency, together with wind conditions which present a challenge for conventional gear (tailwheel) pilot, in an emergency the pilot-in-command is authorized to deviate from regulations as necessary for safety.
Quote
Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 91, section 91.3 allows deviations from regulations during emergencies that allow the PIC to make the best decision to ensure safety of all personnel during these contingencies. Also, by declaring an emergency during flight, that aircraft becomes a priority to land safely. Pilots who become apprehensive for their safety for any reason should request assistance immediately.

REF: Part 91, A, Section 91.3

If the runways and corresponding taxiways C, D, Z and W were clear(ed), it appears that taxiway C is oriented more closely with surface wind from the southeast.
Taxiway C (between E and A) is not completely straight, but that aircraft type would not typically require other than a short landing roll-out (at a relatively low, ground speed).
Large/tundra tires help for landing on a paved/un-paved surfaces.

Thankfully what matters most: it appears that no one was injured and there was a safe outcome for the pilot.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 06:20:24 PM by mik_ny »

Offline GeoffSM1

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Re: 24 April: Hard landing at Spirit of St Louis Airport (KSUS), Missouri
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2017, 07:23:48 PM »
Many thanks that comprehensive reply.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 12:52:46 AM by GeoffSM1 »